1. Thought Exercise…

    journalofajournalist:

    What happens when Facebook expands into post-Castro Cuba and post-Kim North Korea?

    How quickly will these locked down countries quickly embrace the pervasive nature of Social media networking?  Are there clues to the possible results seen in the “Arab Spring” and the adaptation of networking tools to helping create a spread of revolt?

  2. leanmeanworkoutmachine:

Reasons to exercise alone
You can work out whenever you want and when it best fits your schedule. Plus you never have to deal with someone being late.
You can skip the chitchat and focus on your breath and inner thoughts. It’s a great time to make mental to-do lists, brainstorm for work, or daydream about weekend plans. Going solo means it’s really “me” time.
The type and intensity of the workout is up to you, whether you feel like going for a run in your neighborhood, hitting a Zumba class, or following a gentle yoga video.
You can stuff your ears with headphones and rock out to that new cardio mix you made.
It’s OK to wear the same outfit you wore yesterday, even if you didn’t wash it. There’s no one to make a comment or complain about a little stink.
Your workout will be completed in less time. You know when you exercise with someone else, a lot of time is wasted waiting for the person to show up, then chatting about what you want to do, and then after the workout, you can’t help but chat some more. You’ll easily save 10 to 20 minutes by exercising on your own.
You’re your own motivation. Sometimes when I have a fitness date with a buddy and they bail, I’m more likely to skip out, too. But if it’s just me planning on a morning workout, there’s no one to persuade me to ditch, so I’m more likely to stay committed. Plus when you’re used to exercising alone, you’ll get into the habit and won’t need to rely on someone else to get your workouts in.
It’s easier to stick to training schedules or goals since there’s no one else’s agenda to cater to but your own.
If you’re under the weather and don’t feel like getting your sweat on, no one will give you lip for it.

    leanmeanworkoutmachine:

    Reasons to exercise alone
    • You can work out whenever you want and when it best fits your schedule. Plus you never have to deal with someone being late.
    • You can skip the chitchat and focus on your breath and inner thoughts. It’s a great time to make mental to-do lists, brainstorm for work, or daydream about weekend plans. Going solo means it’s really “me” time.
    • The type and intensity of the workout is up to you, whether you feel like going for a run in your neighborhood, hitting a Zumba class, or following a gentle yoga video.
    • You can stuff your ears with headphones and rock out to that new cardio mix you made.
    • It’s OK to wear the same outfit you wore yesterday, even if you didn’t wash it. There’s no one to make a comment or complain about a little stink.
    • Your workout will be completed in less time. You know when you exercise with someone else, a lot of time is wasted waiting for the person to show up, then chatting about what you want to do, and then after the workout, you can’t help but chat some more. You’ll easily save 10 to 20 minutes by exercising on your own.
    • You’re your own motivation. Sometimes when I have a fitness date with a buddy and they bail, I’m more likely to skip out, too. But if it’s just me planning on a morning workout, there’s no one to persuade me to ditch, so I’m more likely to stay committed. Plus when you’re used to exercising alone, you’ll get into the habit and won’t need to rely on someone else to get your workouts in.
    • It’s easier to stick to training schedules or goals since there’s no one else’s agenda to cater to but your own.
    • If you’re under the weather and don’t feel like getting your sweat on, no one will give you lip for it.

    (via georgie-ray-deactivated20120923)

  3. leanmeanworkoutmachine:

Need a nutritionist to answer questions at the supermarket? Perhaps a personal trainer for running a first-time 5K? Or surely a shrink to talk out that fear of flying? We’ve rounded up the 63 best apps* that offer these services and much, much more. Check out the list — organized by category — and download a step to living healthily, appily ever after.
*Clicking the picture will take you to the list complete with APP description. Clicking the name of each app will take you to their individual site. 
Workout Programs
Vitogo
CardioTrainer
JEFIT
Fitness Builder
Nike BOOM
StrongLifts 5x5
Nike Training Club
Sportaneous
iFightBack 
Workout Trackers
Fitocracy
MyFitnessPal
GymPact
Workout Trainer
GymBuddy
Fleetly Fitness
Alpine Replay
Running
runtastic
MapMyRun
Nike+ GPS
Couch-to-5k
RunKeeper
Runmeter GPS
miCoach
Zombies, Run!
Yoga
Pocket Yoga
All-In Yoga
Nutrition & Weight Loss
Fooducate
ShopWell
Whole Foods Market Recipes
Yumee
Caffeine Zone
Weight Watchers Mobile
MealSnap
MyPlate Calorie Tracker
The Eatery
Noom Weight Loss Coach
Lose It!
CalorieCounter
Diet & Food Tracker 
Medical
HealthTap Express
MyQuitCoach
ZocDoc
Skeletal Systems Pro
Epocrates
Skin Scan
GlucoseBuddy
JetLag RX
Cooking
Green Kitchen
Cookwell
Cook It Allergy Free
Substitutions
CookingLight Quick & Healthy Menu Maker
Epicurious Recipe & Shopping List
Stress Reduction
Stress Check
Relax & Rest Guided Meditations
Awareness
Sleep
SleepCycle
Pzizz
Boost Brainpower
Brain Trainer
Memory Trainer Pro

    leanmeanworkoutmachine:

    Need a nutritionist to answer questions at the supermarket? Perhaps a personal trainer for running a first-time 5K? Or surely a shrink to talk out that fear of flying? We’ve rounded up the 63 best apps* that offer these services and much, much more. Check out the list — organized by category — and download a step to living healthily, appily ever after.

    *Clicking the picture will take you to the list complete with APP description. Clicking the name of each app will take you to their individual site. 

    Workout Programs

    Workout Trackers

    Running

    Yoga

    Nutrition & Weight Loss

    Medical

    Cooking

    Stress Reduction

    Sleep

    Boost Brainpower

    (via )

  4. paleoexpress:

This here is the Paleo Diet. If you can follow this then your living the paleo way.

    paleoexpress:

    This here is the Paleo Diet. If you can follow this then your living the paleo way.

  5. atticuschapin:

    I understood every part of that perfectly and I do in fact believe that makes me a better human being than those who do not. 

    (via good-gollymissmolly11-deactivat)

  6. The Ruler And The Killer
    by Kid Cudi
    album The Hunger Games: Songs From District 12 And Beyond

    brain-food:

    Kid Cudi — The Ruler And The Killer 

  7. Ultimate Guide to Eating Paleo

    paleoly:

    More Health and Fitness News & Tips at Greatist.

    (Source: paleolyold)

  8. Wall Street's Broken Windows

    sarahlee310:

    James Q. Wilson was a political scientist who often studied the government response to blue collar crime. The public knows him best for his theory called “broken windows.” The metaphor was what happens to a vacant building when broken windows are not promptly repaired. Soon, most of the windows in the abandoned building are broken. The criminals feel little compunction against petty destruction because the building’s owners evince no concern for the integrity of their building. Wilson took social norms, community, and ethics seriously. He argued that as community broke down fewer honest citizens were active in monitoring and policing behavior. The breakdown in community was criminogenic – it led to widespread serious blue collar crime. He urged us to take even minor blue collar crimes and breaches of civility seriously and to demand that they be contained through social pressure and policing.

    […]

    Wilson was strongly conservative. His research focus in criminology was almost exclusively blue collar crime. That was a shame because “broken windows” theory is most compelling in the context of elite white-collar crime and because the application would reveal interesting twists in the theory’s potential. Such an application, however, would have been outside Wilson’s comfort zone. Wilson tended to use the word “crime” to refer exclusively to blue collar crime and his emphasis was on very low status criminals. In a book entitled, Thinking About Crime, Wilson argued that criminology should focus overwhelmingly on low-status blue collar criminals.

    [..]

    Taking Wilson’s “broken windows” reasoning seriously in the elite white collar crime context would require us to take a series of prophylactic measures to restore integrity and strengthen peer pressures against misconduct. Indeed, we have implicitly tested the applicability of “broken windows” reasoning in that context by adopting policies that acted directly contrary to Wilson’s reasoning. We have adopted executive and professional compensation systems that are exceptionally criminogenic. We have excused and ignored the endemic “earnings management” that is the inherent result of these compensation policies and the inherent degradation of professionalism that results from allowing CEOs to create a Gresham’s dynamic among appraisers, auditors, credit rating agencies, and stock analysts. The intellectual father of modern executive compensation, Michael Jensen, now warns about his Frankenstein creation. He argues that one of our problems is dishonesty about the results. Surveys indicate that the great bulk of CFOs claim that it is essential to manipulate earnings. Jensen explains that the manipulation inherently reduces shareholder value and insists that it be called “lying.” I have seen Mary Jo White, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, who now defends senior managers, lecture that there is “good” “earnings management.”

    Fiduciary duties are critical means of preventing broken windows from occurring and making it likely that any broken windows in corporate governance will soon be remedied, yet we have steadily weakened fiduciary duties. For example, Delaware now allows the elimination of the fiduciary duty of care as long as the shareholders approve. Court decisions have increasingly weakened the fiduciary duties of loyalty and care. The Chamber of Commerce’s most recent priorities have been to weaken Sarbanes-Oxley and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. We have made it exceptionally difficult for shareholders who are victims of securities fraud to bring civil suits against the officers and entities that led or aided and abetted the securities fraud. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (PSLRA) has achieved its true intended purpose – making it exceptionally difficult for shareholders who are the victims of securities fraud to bring even the most meritorious securities fraud action.

    The Supreme Court has held that banks and other entities that aid and abet securities fraud are immune from suit by the victims of securities fraud. Only the federal government may sue those that aid and abet fraud. The federal government has cut the number of financial fraud prosecutions by over one-half over the last twenty years even as financial fraud has grown massively. No elite CEO leading a control fraud that helped drive the current crisis has even been indicted. Elite CEOs can defraud with near impunity and become wealthy. Elite white collar fraud is a “sure thing” – the only strategy likely to make a mediocre CEO wealthy and famous.

    Because Wilson did not research elite white collar crimes he did not direct his formidable intellectual energies and expertise to the study of who could prevent the breaking of corporate windows and repair those that were broken. This was a great loss because his studies of varieties of police behavior in response to blue collar crime are justly famous among criminologists. The central truth he would have quickly recognized had he thought of seeking to reduce elite white collar crimes is that only the financial regulators can serve as the “regulatory cops on the beat.” The police do not deal with elite white collar crimes. A small cadre of FBI special agents works on elite white collar crimes. There are roughly three special agents assigned to white collar crime investigations per industry in the U.S., so they never “patrol a beat.” They investigate only when someone brings a possible white collar crime to their attention. That means whistleblowers, but it overwhelmingly means criminal referrals from the federal financial regulators. Financial institutions may make criminal referrals against their customers, but they will virtually never make them against their CEOs. Only the regulators can make the thousands of criminal referrals against elite white collar criminals essential to a successful prosecutorial effort against the epidemics of accounting control fraud that drive our worst financial crises. In the lead up to the ongoing crisis we gutted the federal regulators, preempted the state regulators, and appointed anti-regulators to head the agencies. A majority of the U.S. House of Representatives is trying to further gut the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). If we want to stop the criminals who are destroying our economy and our communities by breaking windows on an epic scale the first step is to rebuild a regulatory force committed to serving as the essential “cops on the beat.”

    Read the rest….